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Tag: Picture Books (1-6 of 6)

See 'Very Hungry Caterpillar' author Eric Carle's latest work -- EXCLUSIVE

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Hungry for more gorgeous, hand-painted collagework from Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal winner Eric Carle? You’re in luck!

The beloved illustrator has collaborated with 13 other award-winning children’s book artists — including Elephant and Piggie creator Mo Willems, Max and Ruby creator Rosemary Wells, and Jon Klassen of I Want My Hat Back fame — for a brand new picture book called What’s Your Favorite Animal, Carle’s first new work in two years. In this anthology, each artist gets two pages to draw and describe his or her own favorite animal; picks run the gamut from predictable (a giraffe) to decidedly whimsical (an “Amazonian Neotropical Lower River Tink-Tink). All royalties from the book will be donated to The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Mass., not far from Carle’s old home in Northampton.

Want to know which critter Carle chose to highlight? Hint: It’s not the caterpillar.

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Newly unearthed Richard Scarry book to be published -- EXCLUSIVE IMAGES

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There’s a new addition to the busy world of Richard Scarry.

Next August, Random House will publish Best Lowly Worm Book Ever, a charming picture book starring one of Scarry’s most recognizable and beloved characters. Its release will come 20 years after the prolific Scarry — who wrote and illustrated more than 300 picture books — died of a heart attack in 1994. (HarperCollins will release the book Sept. 26 in the U.K.)

Best Lowly Worm Book Ever was discovered by Scarry’s son Richard Jr. — also known as Huck — in Scarry’s Gstaad studio. “Under his drawing table were several grey cardboard portfolios containing rough sketches of book ideas done on tracing paper,” Huck explained to EW via email. “Although most of the sketches were simply rough ideas, one set appeared quite advanced, with typewriter-written blocks of text on each page. It was a book about Lowly, and it looked like something which might be brought to completion fairly easily.”
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Celebrate the March on Washington with 'Martin & Mahalia'

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On August 28, 1963, hundreds of thousands of people flooded Washington, D.C., marching in one of the largest peaceful demonstrations in American history — and listening with bated breath to speeches and performances by figures like NAACP leader Roy Wilkins, gospel legend Mahalia Jackson, and, of course, Martin Luther King, Jr.

50 years later, celebrated author/illustrator — and wife/husband — team Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney are celebrating that milestone with a new picture book, Martin & Mahalia: His Words, Her Song. As the title implies, the story focuses on the friendship between Jackson and King, as well as the pair’s shared connections.

“Each of their personal stories kind of mirror each other,” Davis Pinkney explained to EW. “You see young Martin in the church, speaking the gospel, praying the gospel, seeking it, teaching it. And there’s Mahalia as a child — as it says, she sang the gospel, worked the gospel, led the gospel, spread the gospel. Those beautiful ribbons of harmony came together throughout the civil rights movement.”

For more on Jackson and King’s unique relationship and the book itself — not to mention a glimpse at one of Pinkney’s gorgeous painted illustrations — check out the rest of our interview below.
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'Little House on the Prairie' star Melissa Gilbert to publish first picture book -- EXCLUSIVE

Ma and Pa Ingalls must be so proud.

Actress Melissa Gilbert, best known for playing feisty Laura Ingalls on the beloved ’70s and ’80s TV series Little House on the Prairie, will release her first picture book next year. Gilbert’s first book, the New York Times bestselling memoir Prairie Tale, was published in 2009.

Her latest venture is called Daisy and Josephine. The story follows its two titular characters, a shy little girl and the rambunctious pet who draws her out of her shell. It was inspired by Gilbert’s French bulldog, who shares a name with the puppy in her book. The photo above — a picture of Gilbert in her Little House days — will serve as the actress’s author photo.

Gilbert is collaborating with illustrator Julia Kuo, an artist who has previously worked with Newbery Medal-winning author Cynthia Kadohata and New York Times bestselling author Jenny Han.

Daisy and Josephine will hit shelves January 28, 2014.

Read more:
Kelley Armstrong and Melissa Marr on their middle-grade debut ‘Loki’s Wolves’ — EXCLUSIVE
‘Good Morning America’ host Robin Roberts to write a memoir
Here’s the title of Laini Taylor’s third ‘Daughter of Smoke & Bone’ novel. Plus, a special trailer! — EXCLUSIVE

Feast your eyes on the trailer for Dan Krall's 'The Great Lollipop Caper' -- EXCLUSIVE

Fact #1: All children love lollipops. Fact #2: Most children don’t care for capers, by which I mean the edible bud of the deciduous capparis spinosa plant. (You know, the stuff you eat with lox — also a thing kids don’t like.)

These two truths were enough to inspire a new book from prolific animator/author Dan Krall, best known for his work on TV series like Power Puff Girls and Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends, as well as movies including Coraline and How To Train Your Dragon. His latest, the punneriffic The Great Lollipop Caper, follows — you guessed it — a “cranky caper” who hatches a salty plan to win the hearts of children everywhere. Check out the exclusive, silent movie-inspired trailer for the book below.

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'This Is Not My Hat' author Jon Klassen on his Caldecott Medal win: 'I feel like I'm going to get hit by a bus' -- EXCLUSIVE

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In December, we named This Is Not My Hat one of the 10 Great Kids Books of 2012. So it came as no surprise to us when author/illustrator Jon Klassen’s witty picture book (and the follow-up to 2011’s excellent I Want My Hat Back) took home the Caldecott Medal at this year’s ALA Midwinter Meeting. Klassen, on the other hand, was shocked. “You don’t really know if you have a shot,” he told EW today. “It’s such a prestigious award that the idea of winning one is pretty easy to put out of your head.” Check out our full interview with the author/illustrator below for more on his upcoming projects, a third Hat book, and why he thinks he’s going to get hit by a bus.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: How did you find out that you’d won?
JON KLASSEN: They called early in the morning.

How early?
“Pretty early. I’ve heard I got a bit of a break. Normally they call at 6 in the morning. I was catching a plane that morning to San Jose and the cabbie called first and said he was downstairs. Then after he hung up the phone, [the ALA called]. You don’t really expect a call. You try and put it out of your head. You know what’s going on, but you’re not like, ‘I’m going to sit by the phone and wait for this thing.’ You’re just going to break your own heart. But they called as I was putting the phone down and said, ‘You’ve won the Golden Caldecott for this book you did.’ I couldn’t believe it. I was sort of half awake and this cab was downstairs and I was all flustered. What they do is, the whole committee around the table, they have you on speaker and you want to say something meaningful.” READ FULL STORY

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